December 31, 2017 Matthew

“My Teenage Son is a Predator”

A story was published by Woman’s Day this month that shares the tragic story of a little girl brutally murdered by her older 13 year old brother in 2007.

It happens to be a particularly ironic story.

This particular boy had a very troublesome upbringing and environment devoid of his father, like too many boys today. “His father wasn’t around much, but when he came to visit Paris at 16 months old, it became clear to me that something was very wrong with him. That year, we found out his dad was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. For our child’s sake, I decided to cut off contact with him.”

The mother severed ties between the boy and his father because of someone’s diagnosis that the father was a paranoid schizophrenic–roughly meaning “out of touch with reality”. That brings in the first irony. What on earth made a woman want to get with a paranoid schizophrenic in the first place? Was she herself ‘out of touch with reality’? She herself relates about her own rough past, “I got sober, but it became harder and harder to live with nothing to take the edge off. I contemplated overdosing to end my life”. It seems she was.

The story of why this boy was cut off from his dad is fraught with problems.

Later the single mother went to college to study “human ecology”. Human ecology theory is based on the study of the relationship between humans and their natural, social, and built environments. Another big irony. The fact that all the learning and well-documented science that we have today on the necessity of father in the home and its adverse impacts on children’s social life and the home environment when he is gone is seemingly left out–entirely–from her professional studies. She earned her degree and not once does she mention the father’s absence as even part of the cause of the boy’s pathological behavior.

And the boy became pathological and unstable. But the mother apparently ‘didn’t notice’ anything, “Of course, we had our issues: He was a teenager…I never, at any point, had any indication that he could kill.”

As soon as he turned 13 he became one of those teenagers with all of its associated “issues”.

When she left for work that fateful afternoon she had just scolded her son, “Paris was pissed off at me. He’d just spent his entire allowance on t-shirts and shoes at the mall, so I scolded him.”

At the same time she was smothering his sister with kisses. I can only imagine the hatred for his mother seething from veins at this point. It put him over the top. He snapped. Completely lost his rockers. Enough was enough. That evening he murders his younger sister. And he doesn’t just murder her, he angrily murders her, beating her and then stabbing her 17 times. It was a violent outburst of revenge. What would his sister have to tell us about the words pouring from his mouth as he stabbed her over and over and over and over…if she were still alive? One can only wonder.

Later after confronting and asking her son why he did this, her son replies, “You used to say that you would never be able to kill anybody unless they hurt one of your kids,” he said. “I bet you didn’t think it was going to turn out like this.” There is something truly profound packed in those angry words, if someone has the ears to hear. He did not express remorse but in fact blamed his own mother. It even seems he justified his actions based on what she “used to say”. “Unless they hurt”. If our ears hadn’t become so excruciatingly dull we could see the pain in those words. “Unless they hurt one of your kids, you would never kill…”

This story was written in the spirit of victim-hood on the mother’s part. The last big irony. She is a victim, and there is no one to blame but her son. Her son simply turned out this way.

But the story glaringly shows itself for how detestable and acutely dark it is. It reeks of denial so strong I can imagine it reaching the nostrils of heaven for the abomination that it is. How can anyone not hate everything that has happened in this family from day one? How this son was cut-off from his dad, neglected, unloved, and pushed to the brink before snapping into insanity. Yet the mother excuses herself from it all. She postures as a victim of her own 13-year old child and blames him for literally everything,

“Only once I understood what Paris is — a predator — was I able to forgive him. For instance, if I was swimming in a beautiful ocean, enjoying myself, and a shark came up and bit my leg off, hopefully I would not spend the rest of my life hating that shark. Hopefully, I would understand that sharks are what they are.

And she, and the rest of our deluded world subscribing to Women’s Day, continue on without a thought in their minds of who the shark really was in this story.

 

 

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